DnD5e

One of the most important things that will really draw TTRPG players in is great non-player characters (NPCs). What makes a good NPC? What makes a bad one? Do you need to flesh out everyone the party meets? Let’s take a look at how you can grab your players’ attention with fantastic NPCs!

There are about a million different ways to play a game of Dungeons & Dragons, and each way is just as valid as the next. From silly games filled with dirty names to voice actors performing world-class improv, it’s easy to see how different people can bring different expectations into each game. The best way to go about making sure everyone is on the same page is a Session Zero.

Despite its longevity, Dungeons and Dragons has remained a curiosity to most people.  Over the last two decades, the slow rise of geek culture has given the game some new exposure.  Popular TV shows like Community and The Big Bang Theory have used the game as a prop.  But arguably, nothing has given the Dungeons and Dragons exposure like Geek and Sundry’s Critical Role; a D&D live played...

Character flaws are a great concept. They add depth to characters. Different gaming systems have different rules for applying them. In Dungeons and Dragons, flaws, bonds, ideals..etc. are used to flesh out a characters personality. They are no more than tools intended to help the player role-play their character. But you have to know how to exploit theses attributes. There is a right way and wrong...

In most situations, it is not the Dungeon Master’s role to lead players. You set the stage. You adjudicate the rules. The players are largely the adversaries from your perspective. So, the idea of coming to their rescue would be out of character, right? Well, sometimes it’s what is required, and it’s the right thing to do. Here is when you do it, why you do it, and how you do it....

Season Two of Force Grey is here, and like its previous season it will showcase D&D’s  upcoming new campaign setting for 2017.

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